Farmington Room Blog: Black History Month

February is Black History Month, and here in the Farmington Room we’re lucky to have some unique and interesting resources for anyone interested in researching local Black history.  Farmington has a special connection with the famous Amistad case, serving as a temporary home for the Spanish ship’s African captives during the landmark Supreme Court trial.

The burial site of Foone, an Amistad captive who drowned in the Farmington River while staying in town. This photo was taken during the re-dedication of his grave site on September 25, 1992.

The burial site of Foone, an Amistad captive who drowned in the Farmington River while staying in town. This photo was taken during the re-dedication of his grave site on September 25, 1992.

We’re very lucky to have copies of several letters concerning the case written by Austin F. Williams, J.T. Norton, and others to Lewis Tappan and the Amistad Committee.  The original documents are held in Louisiana, but our copies are a fantastic resource for local researchers.  Many of them have been transcribed, making them easier to work with.

Here is a quick list of a few other resources you might be interested in, along with links to more information in our catalog.  There’s much more in the Farmington Room, so be sure to stop by and take a look:

The Farmington Room is open to the public on Tuesdays and Wednesdays between the hours of 9:00am and Noon.

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